What Is Keratosis Pilaris And How CAn You Treat It?

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    What Is Keratosis Pilaris And How CAn You Treat It?

    Hey everyone, I am new here and thought I would post this information I found at What is Keratosis Pilaris

    It contains a nice list of possible treatments.

    Here is what they say about KP:

    Do you know someone whose cheeks seem a little too rosy, even when they aren’t blushing? Or perhaps you’ve noticed someone at the gym whose upper arms [or legs] are dotted with small red and/or white bumps, usually smaller than a pinhead? Perhaps, looking in the mirror, you’ve seen patches of these bumps along your thighs, back or buttocks? The odds are strong that you or someone you know has keratosis pilaris (KP).

    Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition sometimes called “chicken skin” and is often confused with allergies, eczema or acne. While it may occur in concert with those conditions, it is not related. To date, it is estimated that 50% or more of the world’s population has KP in one form or another.

    KP is physically harmless, which is one reason many people are not aware of it, let alone the name and its treatments. Still, while KP remains physically harmless, it can manifest as an unsightly condition many would prefer to do without. There is no cure for KP, but fortunately, there exists a wealth of simple, affordable and effective treatments.

    KP manifests itself in a variety of forms and places (and at various stages of your life), but most common are the “chicken skin” or pimple-like bumps that appear on the upper arms and thighs. Significant individual variation exists in the prominence and severity of KP. Studies estimate that 51% percent of cases appear in the first decade of life, 35% in the second, 12% in the third, and 2% in the fourth. The back, buttocks, and facial cheeks are the typical areas affected by KP, though few cases are troubling enough to be alarming. KP is in fact medically harmless and often diminishes with age.

    KP is hereditary, and is passed by way of a single gene from either parent. The name keratosis pilaris comes from the process of “keratinization,” our body’s process for building up the epidermis, or outer-most layer of skin. When the body performs this process too much, too often, or in the wrong areas, excess skin collects around the hair follicles. This creates a miniature cone or clogged pore, much like a small pimple. Though KP bumps are generally smaller than acne, the appearance of small pustules may tempt one to reach for the Loofa.

    The reddish or sometimes brownish appearance of KP bumps comes from inflammation of keratin that is trapped under extra skin and debris. A clean, moisturized skin surface is often the best way to combat minor outbreaks. However, because seasons and certain climate changes can create more raised and reddish bumps than one is comfortable with, and because some cases of KP are not managed by Loofas and lotions alone, we will discuss some advanced regimens and products.

    While there is no real “cure” for KP, there are effective ways to treat the bumps. Many of these treatments come in over-the-counter products and are very effectual when used regularly or in combination with other treatments. However, if you feel your skin is not responding to treatment, or that your KP outbreaks are more severe, make sure you speak to your dermatologist before self-prescribing.
    The strategy for treating KP involves one or more of the following processes: exfoliating, moisturizing, softening, and applying anti-inflammatory agents.

    Some of the agents and recommended products used to treat KP include:

    Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs)

    Glycolic acid and Lactic acid are two AHAs used to minimize the bumps through chemical exfoliation. M.D. Forté Hand and Body Cream contains 20% glycolic acid and other agents to assist in re-texturizing your skin.


    Lactic Acid, which comes in over-the-counter and prescription formulas, is also an effective ingredient for alleviating the appearance of KP bumps. For sensitive skin on the face or in cases of children with KP, LactiCare Lotion is the mildest treatment. Two stronger products for treating more serious cases of KP are AmLactin 12% Moisturizing Cream, AmLactin AP Moisturizing Cream, and Lac-Hydrin 12%.

    Urea

    As with conditions that result in extremely dry and scaly skin, such as psoriasis, eczema, and ichtyosis, you may find your KP affected areas unresponsive to milder treatments. In this case you’ll want to try a product containing urea. Carmol 10 and Carmol 20 are OTC products, but for advanced cases of KP you may want to talk to your Dermatologist or doctor about a prescription for Vanamide or Carmol 40 Cream.

    Glytone’s KP Kit


    As KP often responds well to a multi-faceted approach, consider a therapy regimen that incorporates more than one product, such as Glytone’s KP Kit. Since the goal of KP treatment is to exfoliate, moisturize, and prevent discoloring at the inflamed areas, you’ll find it handy to have both treatments and a gentle puff in one convenient package.

    Vitamin A Treatments


    Sufferers of acne and KP have used vitamin A creams such as Retin A, Tazorac and Differin for years. And while the potency of these products is undeniably effective at treating blemishes, the skin can become dry and pinkishly raw with overuse. For that reason, you may want to start with a nonprescription alternative such as Afirm. Use a small amount of cream applied to the affected areas only once every other day or night.

    Soothing Topical Anti-inflammatories


    Yes, the bumps are receding, you might say, but what about the itch? For an anti-inflammatory with the added benefit of itch relief, Sarnol-HC provides the effectiveness of 1% hydrocortisone. Sarnol HC Lotion’s base compounds help soften, smooth and moisturize the skin. In addition to KP, Sarnol HC Lotion relieves the discomfort of sunburn, poison ivy, poison oak, and insect bites.

    Microdermabrasion

    Microdermabrasion therapies offered through visits to your dermatologist may be the last resort for sufferers of KP, but they can also be costly and inconvenient. However, there are a couple of at-home microdermabrasion products that, when used regularly, can have a similar glowing effect. Neova Microdermabrasion Scrub and Peter Thomas Roth AHA/BHA Face and Body Polish are excellent OTC alternatives.


    As with any long-term goal, persistence is the key to treating keratosis pilaris. It is, after all, a chronic condition that requires long term treatment. But chronic doesn’t mean panic. Regular treatment through the specialized products above will go a long way toward preventing new “chicken skin bumps.”

    Just remember, there’s a lot more to you than a few red bumps, and beauty, as always, is only skin deep.

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    Re: What Is Keratosis Pilaris And How CAn You Treat It?

    It does not seem this forum has the ability to edit your post (at least I can't find it). I just wanted to add that I am in no way affiliated with the site and am not endorsing it's specific products. It's just the information I find useful. You can buy that stuff anywhere you like.

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    Re: What Is Keratosis Pilaris And How CAn You Treat It?

    Hi, thank you so much for this information.I am currently doing scrubs using sugar and lemon juice,...which seem to have worked to some extent in cleaning some of the pores.But for removing the spots please suggest some easy remedy, which is accessible to general mass.

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About KeratosisPilaris.org

Keratosis Pilaris is a very common benign genetic skin condition. KeratosisPilaris.org is the definitive resource for KP on the internet.

KP appears as rough or bumpy skin on the back and/or outer sides of your upper arms. The severity of the symptoms varies from person to person. You can also manifest it on the face as a natural blush (known as KPRF or Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii).

This community is composed primarily of KeratosisPilaris.org community members, but is also open for those interested in the topic.

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